Masahiro Kisada Kyo Shinsa Chawan

Potter: Kisada Masahiro

Approximate size: W4.7″ by H3.1″ or 12.2 by 11.9 by 7.9cm

This tea bowl was created by Masahiro Kisada (1936-), who is a potter from Kyoto and a specialist of the shinsha glaze. He studied with Miyashita Zenju before becoming independent. During his career he’s been selected at the Japan Fine Arts Exhibition, Japan New Craft Art Exhibition, Modern Craft Art Exhibition, Modern Craft Art Kansai Exhibition, Kyoto Craft Art Exhibition, Kyoten Exhibition amongst others and had been the recipient of numerous prizes. He’s a long-standing member of the Japan New Craft Art Kinki Association and Kyoto Prefectural Craft Art Association.

The red oxblood glaze and accompanying cinnabar color is notoriously difficult to create and usually is cause for much breakage and imperfections and at times is cause for half the works from a single firing to be disregarded. It is said that mastering this type of glaze is a lifelong quest, one that Masahiro is well on his way on to reaching the end. Masahiro Kisada was recognized by the government as a traditional craftsman.

Masahiro Kisada (1936-) studied under Miyashita Zenju before going solo. He was selected for the Japan Fine Arts Exhibition, Japan New Craft Art Exhibition, Modern Craft Art Exhibition, Modern Craft Art Kansai Exhibition, Kyoto Craft Art Exhibition, Kyoten Exhibition and other exhibitions. and won awards. He is also a longtime member of the Japan New Craft Art Kinki Association and Kyoto Prefecture’s Arts & Crafts Association. Works focus on Shinsha-yu glaze and color changes in the kiln.

Formed by wheel throwing, from white porcelain, the body shows a great contrast with the thick vivid red copper glaze. The koudai or foot of the bowl is signed by Masahiro’s scratch signature. This would be a chic addition to anyone’s collection.

Copper red oxblood glazes are some of the most unique, intriguing and elusive of all high fire glazes, which is why they are praised and highly sought after by museums and collectors. They are reported to have been discovered in China in the 15th century (ruby glass dates as early as 1500 BC). Oxbloods can be translucent or opaque and vary from rich deep reds, maroons, purples and red fading into clear which, on porcelain, becomes white. As seen in this example.

The creation process of copper red oxblood glaze in oxidation firings. Copper with oxygen is green and when the oxygen is taken away properly and cooled properly, it becomes red. It has long been known that you can reduce an electric kiln by inserting material that will burn to create carbon monoxide and free carbon, but the carbon particles shorten the life of the elements drastically.

The chawan has no chips or cracks and is in excellent condition. Comes with the original high quality paulownia wooden box and dedicated tomonuno (tea-cloth). This is a high class chawan with a glaze that is very hard to master. A perfect chawan for someone who wants an example of the copper red oxblood glaze in his or hers collection.

€220+ shipping cost